Browse Items (70 total)

  • Collection: Forging Alliances

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Yasaka Pagoda exemplifies Inagaki’s admiration for the shrines and temples of his native city Kyoto. Commissioned in the year 589 and continually reconstructed after its original design, the Yasaka Pagoda became a popular subject for woodblock prints…

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Water droppers (suiteki) are used to add water to the ink stone to achieve ideal consistency. This is done by covering and uncovering the small air vent located on the top of the pieces to control the amount of water dripping from the spout located…

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Water droppers (suiteki) are used to add water to the ink stone to achieve ideal consistency. This is done by covering and uncovering the small air vent located on the top of the pieces to control the amount of water dripping from the spout located…

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Water droppers (suiteki) are used to add water to the ink stone to achieve ideal consistency. This is done by covering and uncovering the small air vent located on the top of the pieces to control the amount of water dripping from the spout located…

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One of many children of a poor blacksmith in the provincial city of Aomori, Munakata had only an elementary school education. Inspired, he said, by a reproduction of a Van Gogh painting given to him by a teacher, he determined to become an artist.…

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While in Japan, Beittel focused his study on the mingei (folk art) movement, which valued the work of individual craftsmen making functional objects representative of the region where they were produced. Beittel’s work shared these values. This vase…

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This vase in the form of a sumi ink dropper originates from Karatsu, which is known for its simple, sturdy style of pottery. Karatsu pottery is made from a clay high in iron and can be undecorated or decorated with an iron-based underglaze, giving an…

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This vase is in the kuro (black) oribe style, characterized by the use of shiny black glaze to emphasize the shape of the piece. Oribe style is traditional Mino ware, named after the Mino district in Gifu prefecture. The Oribe style is traced back to…

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Penn State potter Kenneth Beittel, who acquired this vase in Japan in 1967, included it among the “Great Pots I Have Known” in his book Zen and the Art of Pottery. There he describes Shimakoka’s pots as “sturdy, quiet, even comfortable pieces.”…

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While in Japan, Beittel focused his study on the mingei (folk art) movement, which valued the work of individual craftsmen making functional objects representative of the region where they were produced. Beittel’s work shared these values. This vase…
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