Browse Items (70 total)

  • Collection: Forging Alliances

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When the jury of an international art fair in Sao Paolo, Brazil, awarded Kiyoshi Saitō first prize for Japanese art at in 1951, the honor recognized the accomplishment of the sōsaku hanga (creative prints) movement in changing perceptions of…

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This vase is in the kuro (black) oribe style, characterized by the use of shiny black glaze to emphasize the shape of the piece. Oribe style is traditional Mino ware, named after the Mino district in Gifu prefecture. The Oribe style is traced back to…

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Kato’s paddled vase recalls the iconic Japanese blossoming cherry tree. The body of the vase is rounded in a way that captures the curves of a ripe cherry, reaching up to a neck and opening that conjures a cherry stem. The varying shades of pink and…

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Although the term Hagi ware derives from the town of Hagi in Japan’s Yamaguchi Prefecture, its beginnings can be traced to the techniques and traditions of Korean pottery. After Japan invaded Korea in the late 16th century, Korean potters were…

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Hagi ceramics are typically formed on a kickwheel from porous clays and finished with colored slips (liquified clay) and glazes. Hagi ware is finished through the firing process in a noborigama, or multi-chambered climbing kiln. The porousness of…

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Maruta studied with Shōji Hamada, who singled him out as “an artist to represent [Japanese] folk art to the West.” This vase was thrown on a potter’s wheel, fired at a high temperature, topped with a salt glaze and then fired again. The broad…

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Water droppers (suiteki) are used to add water to the ink stone to achieve ideal consistency. This is done by covering and uncovering the small air vent located on the top of the pieces to control the amount of water dripping from the spout located…

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Water droppers (suiteki) are used to add water to the ink stone to achieve ideal consistency. This is done by covering and uncovering the small air vent located on the top of the pieces to control the amount of water dripping from the spout located…

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The tea container, called a cha-ire, is used when making koicha, the thick tea that is the first tea offered to guests at a tea ceremony. This example is by Masami Maruta, one of the best known artists in Kuromuta in the northwest part of the island…

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Michiaki Kaneshige was the son of Toyo Kaneshige (1896-1967), who is credited with the revival of traditional Bizen ceramic techniques. Named for the province formerly known as Bizen, this ware garners its red-orange hues from the high iron content…
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